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Cannabigerolic Acid (CBGA): Everything You Need to Know

Everything You Need to Know About Cannabigerolic Acid (CBGA)

CBGA, or cannabigerolic acid, is often referred to as the ‘mother cannabinoid’ due to its crucial role in the creation of all other cannabinoids within hemp and cannabis plants. Without CBGA, cannabinoids such as CBD, CBC, and THC would not exist. Its significance in cannabinoid biosynthesis was not fully understood until the late nineties, despite being discovered years earlier by Japanese scientists.

What is CBGA and How Does it Work?

CBGA is synthesized during the early stages of cannabis plant development through a series of chemical reactions that involve olivetolic acid (OA) and geranyl diphosphate (GPP). Once formed, CBGA serves as the precursor to various cannabinoid acids, depending on the enzymatic reactions it undergoes. THCA synthase, CBDA synthase, and CBCA synthase catalyze the conversion of CBGA into THCA, CBDA, and CBCA, respectively. Under certain conditions, CBGA can also transform into the cannabinoid CBG through decarboxylation when exposed to heat.

Aside from its role in cannabinoid biosynthesis, CBGA also plays other essential functions in the cannabis plant. As a secondary metabolite, it helps regulate various physiological processes and may have potential applications for human health.

Conclusion

CBGA’s significance as the precursor to all cannabinoids highlights its importance in the cannabis plant and the potential benefits it may offer to humans. Understanding the biosynthesis of cannabinoids like CBGA can provide insights into the therapeutic properties of cannabis and its potential medicinal uses.

Sources

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